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Monday, 30 November -0001 00:00

Staffing Is More Than Putting Butts In Seats

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Staffing Is More Than Putting Butts In Seats

by Bill Catlette

During my travels as a veteran road warrior, I’ve recently encountered some rather remarkable signs of short-staffing, and employees who were (or should have been) wearing “trainee” badges, or perhaps personal flotation devices.

 

From a customer perspective, it’s disheartening to wait interminably for someone (anyone) to show up, check you in, take your food order, or answer the phone, and then to encounter a newbie who has obviously been prematurely dropped into the deep end of the pool with no life preserver or swimming skills. Though perhaps more readily apparent in the travel, hospitality, and retail spaces, this occurrence is by no means unique to those industries.

 

Through the first half of 2017, about 100,000 people left their jobs every day in the U.S. according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Marry that with data indicating that the U.S. currently has a job vacancy backlog of some 6 million open positions, and you quickly understand why recruiters’ tongues are hanging out, and so many others are gagging over the service experience. It also might say something about the abysmal levels of employee engagement and national productivity growth we’re experiencing.

 

On the precept that one of the cruelest things we can do to employees and customers alike is to put new teammates into a situation where they simply cannot succeed, here are three suggestions for managers:

 

Adjust Your Sights – Having a new person join your team is closer to the beginning of the staffing process than the end. Truth be known, your staffing duties will never be over (indeed, you should never stop recruiting), and they won’t be finished with that new teammate until the individual is competent and reasonably comfortable in their new role. So don’t go rushing off the instant after you hand someone their new employee ID card.

 

Get Serious About Onboarding – It’s not unusual to see half of all newly hired hourly workers leave jobs in the first 4 months, says Dr. Autumn D. Krauss in a Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology publication.

 

Plus, an equal portion of outside hires that are brought into the management ranks fail in the initial 18 months of service, according to Dr. Bradford Smart, author of “Topgrading: How Leading Companies Win by Hiring, Coaching and Keeping the Best People.” Many of these failures are quite preventable, and some can no doubt be attributed to poorly designed or badly executed onboarding measures. People who aren’t made to feel welcome, taught the secret handshake, and equipped with the necessary insights and nuances of how things are done in an organization probably won’t be very successful, have much fun, or last long. Moreover, they will tell lots of people about the experience, and your employer brand will take a hit. Speaking of employer reputation, if you haven't checked your Glassdoor rating lately, it might be a good idea.

 

 Take a hard, end-to-end look at your onboarding process. Is the knowledge transfer properly sequenced? Is it delivered in a manner that best matches the user’s preferred learning style? Do you even know what their dominant learning style is? Is it facilitated by your best and brightest, or simply whoever is available at the time? Are you and senior leaders checking in with new hires to build rapport, personally embed bits of institutional fabric and check on progress? You should.

 

Adopt some “re-recruiting” measures to provide a means of checking in with recent hires over the course of their first year or so with the organization. Doing so will pay handsome dividends.

 

Upgrade Skills and Practice De-Selection Where Necessary – Few argue that everyone who finds their way onto an organization’s direct payroll shouldn’t have a mutually developed personal development plan, with time and other resources set aside to work that plan. With the opportunity to build skills, and yes, to bolster one’s resume - a heavy driver of engagement levels - we would do well to be more diligent about this effort.

 

Strange as it may seem, one of the best things you can do for your staffing situation is to actively, but humanely, de-select (remove) people who are chronic non-performers. Failing to do so is committing fraud against them, your customers, and their fellow teammates, who are likely tired of carrying more than their share of the load.

 

Last but not least, don't forget to show your recruiters some love. They do important work, and don’t always get the recognition (or pay) they deserve.

When I begin a new executive coaching engagement, my due-diligence process usually involves conducting focused interviews with a representative sample of my client’s peers, direct and indirect reports, other close associates, sometimes their spouse, and of course, their reporting senior.

One of the questions I ask is, “Does this person enjoy the benefit of the doubt with you?” The implications associated with the answers to this question are material. If a significant portion of the people within my client’s sphere of influence are unable or unwilling to give them credit for trying and adopting new behavior, our task becomes more difficult.

This same principle applies for each of us as leaders, and on a broader basis, within our businesses and other organizations as well.

As leaders, our ability to get people to embrace change, overlook our imperfections and errors, endure hardship, accept unpopular decisions and occasionally leap before looking is tied directly to whether or not we’re getting the benefit of the doubt.

Friday, 28 July 2017 15:41

Huddles or Hurdles? It's Your Choice

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Huddles or Hurdles? It's Your Choice
By Richard Hadden and Bill Catlette

Let's start with some locker room talk. No, not that kind...

This morning, at the Y, I overheard a conversation between two guys who were, like most of the rest of us, getting dressed and groomed in preparation for a day at the office. Guy Number One observed aloud that Guy Number Two seemed to be moving pretty fast, to which Two replied, "Yeah, I have to be in early today. We're having one of our 'huddles'," the latter word being punctuated by both air quotes and an unmistakable eye roll. "Or, as I call them," he said, 'hurdles'. My boss is on this new kick. It's total BS. What a waste of time."

Wow. Huddles. Hurdles. Pretty clever, I thought. But sad.

Three Ways You Might Be Undermining Employee Engagement

by Richard Hadden and Bill Catlette

We won’t bore you with yet another recitation of Employee Engagement stats. They’re ugly. And it’s costing businesses worldwide more than anyone can afford. Way too few people are excited about their work, and the organizations and people they work for. And it shows. Before (but not in place of) worrying about what you’re doing to increase engagement, let’s take a whack at three things you could stop doing that are presently depleting this precious commodity.

1. Giving Fake Reviews - A sizeable movement has been afoot for the last few years suggesting that we should either somehow make performance evaluations more fun (what is it, a dance party?), or perhaps eliminate them altogether.

Why? Because they’re hard… It takes time and effort to prepare for a fair and factual performance discussion; the conversation can be contentious, particularly if that conversation converts to money; and like many other leadership responsibilities, we’ve done an awful job of teaching leaders (at all levels) how to do them, or even providing a good example to emulate. So we should just stop doing them, right? Wrong! Under that logic, we should all stop brushing our teeth, too.

Recognizing and Dealing With Gross Leadership Failure

by Bill Catlette

Memphis: July 2, 2017 

Often there comes a time in the history of an enterprise when a designated leader has lost the followership of those they are responsible for leading. Followers don’t believe what he has to say, don’t feel he has their best interests at heart, they see her holding herself to a lower standard than everyone else, or are perhaps tired of seeing people treated in an abusive or disrespectful manner. At times, it’s just sheer incompetence. Any benefit of the doubt that the leader might once have enjoyed has vanished, permanently. This happens in businesses, governments, churches, non-profits, just about any type of organization you can think of.

There once was a time when it might have been possible to recover from such a gross leadership failure, a time when people were less distracted, more forgiving, and took a really long view of the employment relationship, where a single job lasted for at least half, and maybe an entire career. Those days are gone. In an age when most jobs last slightly less than the first term of an elected President, there simply isn’t time or the mood for redemption. The only viable solution is surgery, radical surgery involving the excision of the leader.

Thursday, 22 June 2017 20:22

Preventing the Next Uber Dumpster Fire

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Preventing the Next Uber Dumpster Fire

by Bill Catlette

 

Nobody in their right mind flies an aircraft, rewires their home, performs surgery, goes skydiving, or engages in many other activities without the benefit of training and/or certification. And if we cared about someone, we wouldn’t stand idly by while they attempted such an endeavor. So, why in the hell do investors and boards with fiduciary responsibility continue to act as though having the requisite leadership skills to run an organization is factory-installed equipment on every entrepreneur or executive? It’s not!

 

Travis Kalanick and several of his compatriots at Uber are just the latest bright, gutsy entrepreneurs to crash and burn from high altitude due to unmitigated blind spots or missing components in their leadership tool kits. And, as is so often the case, it didn’t have to happen. Mr. Kalanick et. al. had resources available to them that, for one reason or another, they simply chose not to, or perhaps didn’t get enough encouragement to use. They will be just fine, though, and so will Uber…eventually. Let’s turn our attention instead to those who remain in or are just signing on to leadership roles, and how boards and senior leaders can do a better job of supporting them, and ensuring the success of their organizations.

 

Great Cakes Start With Great Ingredients

Regardless of position level, we should make certain that necessary hard-wired leadership capabilities are present in every, repeat, every leadership candidate, right from the start. Like lots of other occupations, some elements of the leader’s tool kit cannot easily be taught, if at all. Things like courage and humility are good examples. They either exist in sufficient degree or they don’t. Similarly, other factors which are antithetical to good leadership, e.g., narcissism (present in many who aspire to leadership roles or public office) require more surgery to remove than you or I are licensed to perform, so avoid them, at all costs. 

 

Coach Earlier and More Often

The average Major League Baseball team, with an active roster of 25 players, employs ten position coaches to work regularly with the team. Backed by voluminous performance data for every position and player, the coaches and manager are quick to spot both teaching moments and anomalies, and step in to guide the player. As senior leaders and board members, we should be fostering similar behavior. In that vein, serious attention to “player development” should be as regular a component of our budgeting, planning, and governance processes as any financial or customer metric. Moreover, it’s something that we should take personal interest in. Following are four questions we should all be asking in our organizations:

  1. What are our workforce development priorities?
  2. How much did we spend last year on leader development, and what did we get for it?
  3. How many of our managers have a professional development plan?
  4. How many of our hi-potential leaders are working with a coach, someone who can help accelerate their development, and make sure that they aren’t breathing too much of their own fumes?

If you get consistently accurate answers to even one of these questions throughout your organization, contact me (Bill@ContentedCows.com) and I’ll send you a complimentary copy of our book, Rebooting Leadership. (limited to the first 100 respondents)

 

Don’t Ignore Bad Behavior or Performance

On several occasions I’ve been invited to present to and answer questions from a corporate board about the progress being made in working with one of their senior leaders. I welcome those interactions, not because they’re fun (they aren’t), but because it’s a clear indication that the organization is serious about making progress. I wish more would behave in this manner, and indeed that some would be as quick to notice and sanction bad behavior as they are an earnings or other business plan miss. In nearly all cases, bad behavior will lead to bad performance, and if stopped early enough, it won’t become institutionally embedded like it was at Uber.

Wednesday, 07 June 2017 15:15

Keeping Some of Your Powder Dry

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Keeping Some of Your Powder Dry

by Bill Catlette 

When coaching those who are new to a leadership role, one of the top five items we deal with pertains to the advisability of keeping some of your “powder” dry. Translation: Your role vests a certain amount of authority in you to use positional power in order to get things done; power to decide, to commit resource, to give instructions, even orders, the list goes on. The amount of power one has ready access to is usually a factor of our level on the organizational food chain. It is there for our use, but not abuse. It’s not easily replaced or replenished, hence it is unwise to squander or misuse it. Moreover, it’s really unbecoming.

We’ve all seen so called “leaders” whose sole purpose in life seems to be to throw their weight around because they can, or think they can. In the workplace, they can often be spotted marching people around – Over here! No, over there!... belittling people, or seeking comfort for themselves while others are sweating or suffering. Those people aren’t leaders. There are other words to describe them, and there is always a day of reckoning for them, always. They will be found out and turned out, unceremoniously.

A few thoughts on your use of position power.

Be Quicker and More Courageous in Dealing With New Hires

by Bill Catlette

5/21/17  

Whether one works in the public eye or not, somewhere in the 50 to 100 day window after a person has started a new job, people around them are forming some pretty strong impressions about whether or not "this dog is going to hunt” as they say in Mississippi. I’ll let you in on a little secret; if they are at all self-aware, the person occupying that new job is likely figuring it out before everyone else is. Sadly, too few managers realize this nexus of thought and take advantage of it by initiating “check-in” conversations with the new staff member.

It would seem to stand to reason then, that on a fairly regular basis, monthly perhaps, it would do us good to check in with new hires (at all levels) and compare notes about how things are going. Do they feel fully successful in their new role? Do we share that point of view? What barriers are preventing them from being as successful as they want to be? What successes have they had, and what hard lessons have been learned? Are they having fun? Is the job what they expected it to be?

The Singular "They", and Other Things that Evolve

Richard Hadden

Today's blog post is a video post. If you'd rather read it than watch it, the transcript appears below the video box.

 

 

The longer I live, the more acutely aware I become that we live in an ever evolving world.

For instance, have you heard that the Chicago Manual of Style has just decreed that because the English language evolves, we can now use what’s called "the singular they"? That’s right, we no longer have to say he or she, or him or her, when we can’t or don’t want to specify the gender of the person we’re referring to, or when it doesn’t matter. So I could say “Go find a team member who’s been working exceptionally hard lately, and tell them how much you appreciate them.” I don’t have to say how much you appreciate him or her.

So Language evolves. And so does the world of work.

Saturday, 29 April 2017 15:22

Coaching Tips: Discovering a Reason to Change

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Coaching Tips: Discovering a Reason to Change

by Bill Catlette

One of the most common difficulties encountered by workplace coaches is finding something that will serve as a lever to trigger different, more positive behavior by the individual being coached. Too often, when reaching for a reason or rationale to justify change, we lean on organizational impacts…   “Your tardiness in arriving late to scheduled meetings means that we start late and finish late.” In an era when so many of us are walking around wrapped a little too tightly, self-absorbed, and organizational engagement is extremely weak, these impacts lack potency. They seldom move the needle. So what might work better ?

In reaching for a reason that will cause someone to change, bear in mind that what you’re trying to do is help them see a reason that makes sense to them (not you) to change. So get personal, look for ways to establish a connection between the condition you’re trying to help them change, and something that is personally important to them.

Ask questions, even ones with a sharp point on the end of them. “You’ve told me that you want to build a reputation as a talent magnet. Do you think that chronically wasting people’s time by showing up a few minutes late to every meeting helps or hurts that purpose?” Or, try an analogy. “I know you’ve got a teenage daughter who has begun dating. When your daughter has promised that she will return home from her date by 10PM, how do you feel when she strolls in at 10:20? (Pause to listen, really listen.) Might the people on your team feel the same way about your tardiness to meetings?

Generally, only when we see a reason that makes sense to us to change does it become likely that we will actually take steps to do so. Because we’re all different, with different goals, values, and sensitivities, it often takes two or three attempts before we strike paydirt, but it’s worth it. Change initiatives that are well-founded, with some personal interest at their bedrock are more likely to stick. Try it, and let us know how it worked.

 

If you want to learn more:

 

  1. For self-help, read, “The Coach” by Starcevich and Stowell
  2. For private or small group coaching, contact the author.

When Someone’s Trying to Apologize, Get Off Their Back

by Bill Catlette

I don’t know if you’ve noticed or not, but it has become all too rare for someone, anyone, upon making a mistake to step up, acknowledge their error, meaningfully apologize, make it right as best they can, and promise to do better. Due to lots of poor examples and an over-indulgence of “reality tv”, the reaction from far too many of us when we actually see someone trying to responsibly clean up their mess is to pile on from the safety of the social media cheap seats. Stage a food fight, vote ‘em off the island, and move on to the next episode. I fail to see the benefit in this behavior.

I’m not much of a “Spicey” fan, but that is exactly what happened recently when White House Press Secretary, Sean Spicer momentarily let his mouth outrun his mind and seemed to forget that millions of Jews had been gassed to death during the Holocaust. Within a few short hours of making the gaffe, Spicer appeared live on two networks, in front of the White House, and plainly admitted his mistake, without equivocation. Taking into account his position and the person he has to answer to, his move took considerable courage. Yet, twenty hours later, the howls and tsk tsk’ing have only grown, not abated. 

All we do when we engage in such behavior is drive people, ourselves included, further into the bunker, thereby lessening the odds that future mistakes will be dealt with in an adult manner. Sadly, deflect and denial become even more the standard response, as millions of impressionable youth observe and then mimic our behavior. Beyond the accumulating social rot, we retard productivity growth as learning is slowed when everyone chooses to bury rather than admit and learn from their mistakes. We can and must do better.

Please, the next time someone is legitimately trying to apologize for an error, listen, thank them, and drag at least one knucklehead off their back, United-style.

 

 

 

Tuesday, 21 March 2017 17:02

Speaking Each Other's Language

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Speaking Each Other's Language

Richard Hadden


Let's face it. Communicating at work is tough enough when both the speaker and the listener speak the same native language. Add different tongues to the dynamic and, sacré bleu! You’ve just hit a wall, and not the kind that’s proposed for the US’s southern border.

To be clear, language, as well as literacy (the topic of a future post), are essential job skills for almost any work you can imagine. So how can we possibly hope to get the most from people whose language we don’t understand, and who don’t understand us?

I’ve heard the “This is America. If you want to live and work here, you should learn our language!” argument, and in an ideal sense, I agree. People who speak English in the US have an advantage, just as Italian speakers do in Rome. But we can “should” all over ourselves about a lot of things. Or – and this would be my suggestion – we can take competitive action, and in distinguishing ourselves from our rivals, both for customers and for talent, get better business results.

So, whether you think you should or not, here are two things you can do, if you want to increase the engagement of your team members who don’t speak your language: (These specifics assume your work takes place in English - but the concept works for any language.)

6 Tips to Get Your Employees Engaged
By Sydney Frazer, Partnerships Manager, Glassdoor

Employee engagement is often the buzz among HR circles. You hear about it and you know you should take steps to engage with your employees. You probably even know only a minority of the American workforce is engaged (in fact, only 32 percent is considered engaged). But why should you care about this? And how can you become a part of the solution? Once you develop an understanding of the importance of employee engagement, you can take steps to develop and harness the power of an engaged workforce.

But first let’s take a step back and look at the why. The data is compelling and makes it pretty clear. Research from Gallup indicates that companies with engaged workforces outperform others in multiple business aspects, all the way from productivity, to customer ratings, to profitability. Furthermore, companies with engaged employees see a significantly lower turnover rate, helping decrease the incredible costs associated with turnover. Employee engagement is crucial to the success of your company.

The good news is that 90 percent of executives understand this. However, less than 50 percent of execs actually understand how to address engagement issues. This makes addressing an apathetic staff seem overwhelming at best and impossible at worst. But the best time to start trying is now. Consider these six tips in order to start engaging with your workforce.

On Baseball, Long Hair, Married Priests, HR, and the “Department of No”

by Bill Catlette

03.12.17

 

The sports press was abuzz this week about something that didn’t involve balls, strikes, birdies, or 3-pointers. Rather, it was about hair, specifically the prolific red locks belonging to NY Yankees rookie Center Fielder prospect, Clint Frazier.

Since something like forever, the Yankees have maintained a strict personal appearance policy that prohibits players from wearing long’ish (below the collar) hair or beards. It’s about pride and professionalism, the “Yankee way” as they call it. It seems that, whereas Mr. Frazier had gotten the memo, he hadn’t gotten the message, prompting some ah hem coaching from team owner, Jennifer Steinbrenner, coach, Joe Girardi, even former Hall of Famer, Reggie Jackson, who still works for the team. Message received… According to Mr. Frazier, “Just after thinking to myself and talking to a few people, I finally came to the agreement that it’s time to look like everybody else around here.” Crisis averted, maybe.

A world away, Pope Francis allowed that maybe, just maybe, the Catholic church might be open to ordaining married men as priests. I don’t know whether that’s a white smoke or black smoke signal coming from the Vatican chimney, but I bet it has everything to do with recruiting, and a serious dearth of talent for those who would be priests.

Looking back on my early career as an HR professional, I distinctly recall similar business practices, if not outright policies being rather permanently woven into the fabric of the organizations I was exposed to: We mustn’t hire women drivers, our customer-facing employees cannot wear beards, I won’t even get into the dress codes. Some of this stuff was backed by sound reasoning. Some wasn’t. In retrospect, the thing that I regret is that, in too many cases, with good company I / we failed to ask the question that someone apparently put to the Pope, probably more than once:  Why not?

Too often, I’m afraid that we were simply serving as the “Department of No.” There will be no this. There will be no that. At the time, it was deemed the safer alternative. We served as a compliance function before the real compliance pros came along and turned it into an art form. Well intended as we were, I’m rather sure that we weren’t serving the organizations that were paying us all that well. Yeah, we were pretty good prophylactics, but I dare say that what the organizations often needed and wanted more was a curious, knowledgeable, thinking business partner. Today’s organizations are no different. They’re just moving a lot faster, and they need HR professionals and leaders with the courage to sustain valuable elements of corporate culture while, on a regular basis asking, “Why not?” 

 If you would like to take this topic to a different level in a one-on-one coaching session, keynote speech, or seminar, we would love to hear from you.

 

With Healthcare Reform, Nothing Doesn’t Trump Something

03.11.17

As Americans, we’re more than a little interested in the current goings on with regard to “Repeal and Replace,” for several reasons. As with many others, it affects our business. Over the last ten years, we have doubtless done more work in the healthcare arena than any other sector. At the same time, not unlike anyone else who is aging (it beats the alternatives), we personally consume more healthcare services than ever. And, as a leader of a non-profit healthcare organization (@NFT), I have added incentive to stay abreast of the happenings in this space. Does that make us experts? Certainly not. Passionately, seriously interested? Absolutely. A few thoughts: 

“This is a big, f’ing deal” - As quietly whispered (he thought) into President Obama’s ear by Vice President, Joe Biden upon passage of the ACA the U.S. healthcare system is a big deal, a really big deal, at 18% of an $18 trillion economy. Healthcare expenditures for the average American are about $10,000. annually. It’s not just big, it’s very complex, with all kinds of moving, inter-related parts. Think giant Rubik’s cube that you’ve gotta get pretty close to perfect, or things go bad in a big way. With a small policy oversteer to the port or starboard, we could stall the U.S. economy, further degrade our anemic productivity growth rate, and / or unnecessarily endanger the lives of a lot of people.

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